Journal of Information Systems Education (JISE)

Volume 22

Volume 22 Number 4, Pages 331-346

Winter 2011


The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators’ Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics


Brandi N. Guidry
David P. Stevens
Michael W. Totaro

University of Louisiana - Lafayette
Lafayette, LA 70504, USA

Abstract: This study examines instructors' perceptions regarding the skills and topics that are most important in the teaching of a Systems Analysis and Design (“SAD”) course and the class time devoted to each. A large number of Information Systems (“IS”) educators at AACSB accredited schools across the United States were surveyed. Shannon‟s entropy is used to analyze the opinions and measure the agreement or disagreement among survey respondents. Findings suggest that object-oriented analysis and structured analysis are topics on which instructors spend the most time, and are also the topics for which there is the greatest disagreement regarding importance. Conversely, the greatest agreement among survey respondents occurs with topics that, on the whole, were perceived as less important and to which less class time is devoted. This analysis provides a basis for comparison to practitioner perceptions.

Keywords: Systems analysis & design, System development tools & methods, Structured analysis & design, Object-oriented SDLC

Download this article: JISE - Volume 22 Number 4, Page 331.pdf


Recommended Citation: Guidry, B. N., Stevens, D. P., & Totaro, M. W. (2011). The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators’ Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics. Journal of Information Systems Education, 22(4), pp. 331-346.